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Amazon Has Been Accused Of Having An 'Anti-Parent' Work Culture

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Think about the last time you were up consoling a sick toddler or feeding your newborn. Once they settle down and you are left sitting there, baby in your arms, it's almost like clockwork to pick up your phone and open up the Amazon app. Now, these moments are never for shopping for anything glamour, these are the moments whenever you remember everything that you are running low on around your home, click "add to cart" and they show up on your doorstep in forty-eight hours. It's awesome.

Now, the company that is truly every moms saving grace has been accused of having an anti-parenting work culture. Hmmm. It seems a little odd to us that a company that relies on moms so much wouldn't be favoring them in every way possible, but this is not looking like the case as 1,800 moms at Amazon are trying to change things.

The women who have joined together are calling themselves "the Momazonians" and will be meeting with senior managers at Amazon to discuss their grievances. There is a company culture that is pretty harsh on women and that needs to change so that whether you are a mom working in an Amazon warehouse fulfilling orders or sitting behind a computer and running the website - everything is equal.

What will these women be advocating for? They are seeking something called backup daycare to be available to them, something that is readily available at a lot of major tech companies.

Basically, backup daycare is childcare that is offered on short notice. If something happens where the child gets sick and can't go to their regular daycare or a babysitter cancels on the parent at the last minute, this would be where they would go. The fact that this would mean that moms would miss less work should be attractive to Amazon, but it seems like they are getting some unnecessary pushback.

Beyond the childcare issue, many Amazon mom employees have shared stories about how they don't put family pictures on their desk so they don't get labeled as a "distracted mom," while others are getting to work earlier than necessary and leaving much later than they need to avoid a negative company culture.

And if you're wondering, Amazon does offer some parent-friendly perks, but childcare isn't considered a necessity so it's not one of them. I guess we'll all be thinking about this case the next time we open up our favorite shopping app.

READ NEXT: Having A Working Mom Benefits Kids Later In Life

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