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Peep On A Perch Is The Easter Answer To Elf-On-The-Shelf

Chances are that by now, you've heard of the tiny pain in the neck known as the Elf on a Shelf. He is a tiny Christmas menace that kids (and some parents) seem to adore. For those who don't know, parents use the Elf to manipulate their kids into behaving around Christmastime. And now, the Elf has a new holiday sidekick — the Peep on a Perch. Yes, you're reading that correctly. There is a stuffed version of a marshmallow peep who will sit on a shelf in your house (or several) and coerce your kid into doing kind acts before Easter.

Similar to the Elf on a Shelf, the Peep on a Perch assists the Easter Bunny, doing things like coloring eggs and filling Easter baskets. We have questions about how a Peep does those things without opposable thumbs, but we digress. The ultimate purpose of the Peep on the Perch is to instill a sense of kindness into your kids into the weeks leading up to Easter. Since Easter is a mostly religious holiday, acts of charity and kindness make sense.

The Peep, which is a plush version of the controversially beloved marshmallow Easter candy, doesn't have to be quite as involved as the Elf thankfully. If you wanted to post him in your kiddo's room to watch them do things like homework, or getting ready for bed with minimal fuss, that's a great option. They do not need elaborate setups or grappling hooks to get their point across.

Peep On A Perch
Credit: Amazon

"Children will be proud to have the Easter Peep watch them being good all day as they get ready for bed without making a fuss, help out around the house, and use good manners. And the more kindness the Easter Peep sees, the happier the Easter Peep gets!" reads the product description.

While it's obviously great to get your kid to do good deeds like helping around the house and cleaning their room, one wonders if the Peep on a Perch is really necessary. Shouldn't we be encouraging our kids to be nice to their siblings and go to bed with minimal fuss without a stuffed marshmallow Peep "watching" them? Unlike with Christmas, what is the payout for their good deeds? More Peeps in their baskets? An extra chocolate egg? A bunny?

In theory, the Peep on a Perch is a fun read with a cute back story, but for $19, you can probably buy a lot of plastic eggs and jelly beans. You can get the Peep on a Perch from retailers like Target and Amazon.

READ NEXT: Psychologist Warns Elf On Shelf Could Be Damaging To Kids

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